Immigration Lawyer New York

38127293_sImmigration of individuals from one nation to one more has been going on for many years. Right now, more then ever men and women are trying to immigrate to foreign nations in search of improved opportunities and a much better life-style. The Usa of America is among the most preferred destinations for immigration and New York is among one of your most preferred cities by individuals from all over the world. So for those who belong to another country and wish to settle down in New York, you are going to need to hire the services of immigration lawyer in New York.

There are many legal points that require to be regarded ahead of you could become the citizen of any country. The laws relating to immigration are extremely complicated containing quite small legal nuances. All these nuances are not incredibly uncomplicated for a frequent individual to understand and this exactly why you can call for the solutions of an immigration lawyer. You can need to understand all about these issues clearly if you need to settle down at New York in the United states of America.

The main reason for you personally to hire the solutions of an Albany NY immigration lawyer is due to the complicated nature on the immigration laws of America. In place of trying on your own to understand these complex laws, it can be improved to seek the services of an expert immigration lawyer who has the information and also the practical experience of coping with immigration related difficulties. Another cause is the fact that immigration laws preserve on altering and lawyers are the most effective source for any individual to understand about all of the modifications that has taken spot.

There are numerous immigration lawyers who operate in New York, nevertheless it is critical for you personally find out and hire the solutions in the best lawyers to deal with your immigration situation. You spend funds to employ the solutions of lawyers, so you need to make sure that you get the correct worth of the funds. Make sure that the lawyer is really a member of AILA or American Immigration Lawyers Association. An AILA lawyer has access to all of the facts that can enable in speeding up your approach of immigration towards the nation. They see to it that your immigration application gets processed really swiftly through the correct channels.

Take an estimation on the quantity that the immigration lawyer will charge you. Find out that if the price is hourly or not. This can allow you to in obtaining out approximately how much dollars you are going to have to spend for the solutions and also you can make arrangements accordingly. Also discover what is going to be the charges if your application is rejected on account of any explanation and if an appeal has to be filed. You have to be clear about all this ahead of you hire the services of an Albany NY immigration lawyer.

One significant point which you’ll want to verify out about the lawyer is his/her track record as an immigration lawyer. What exactly is the accomplishment rate and if there has been any failure, what have been the reasons for it. If your lawyer has more knowledge, then possibilities for the productive processing of your immigration application also increases.

TMZ: Fogle's legal team says FBI search turned up nothing incriminating

ZIONSVILLE, Ind. (WISH/WANE) — Former Subway spokesman Jared Fogles’s legal team says it’s confident the FBI search turned up nothing incriminating, TMZ reports.

Fogle’s home was raided last Tuesday as part of a child porn investigation after the former director of his foundation was arrested.

Fogle has not been arrested, and no charges have been filed against him.

After the raid, Subway quickly made changes to its website, taking down a section called “Jared’s Journey.”

The spokesperson for Subway also had a foundation, which encouraged children to live healthy lifestyles to prevent obesity. However, in light of the FBI raid, the Associated Press reported the foundation was dissolved by the state of Indiana in 2012 after year’s of failing to pay a $5 reporting fee.

However, despite that move by the state, the foundation still has its tax-exempt status with the Internal Revenue Service.

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Florida Supreme Court denies Bar dues hike for legal aid

Published: Sunday, July 12, 2015 at 6:30 a.m.
Last Modified: Sunday, July 12, 2015 at 3:50 a.m.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Lawyers pushing for more money for legal aid to the poor will have to look elsewhere after the Florida Supreme Court rejected a proposed dues increase for Florida Bar members.

The justices ruled last week that a more comprehensive solution is needed for legal aid funding woes. A coalition of attorneys had proposed a Bar dues increase of $100 to help fund the program.

The dues are currently $265 a year and have held steady for 20 years.

Gov. Rick Scott this year vetoed a small funding increase for legal aid in this year’s state budget.

Three Supreme Court justices dissented, contending it was wrong to deny attorneys a chance to solve at least some of the legal aid funding problems through the relatively small dues increase.

DRPD officer arrested: Accused recently won legal battle to return to work

A Del Rio police officer who had only recently returned to work after a long legal battle with the city was arrested Friday after he was accused of attacking a woman in late June, police department officials said.

DRPD Senior Officer Daniel Jalomos Jr., 29, was arrested at 4 p.m. Friday and charged with the offense of assault causing bodily injury/family violence, a Class A misdemeanor, DRPD Capt. Fred Knoll Jr. said Friday.

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Maricopa County To Include Same-Sex Couples In Adoption Legal Fee Assistance

Maricopa County will now give free legal help to same-sex couples seeking non-contested adoptions. The same help opposite-sex couples already receive. This comes after county attorney Bill Montgomery refused to provide these free services earlier this year.

In the past, Montgomery said an appeals court ruling that made same-sex marriage legal did not apply to state adoption laws. He still holds that opinion, but now has contracted 10 lawyers to help all couples with non-contested adoptions. James Taylor-Zaborski sees this step as an important one. He and his husband have been going through an adoption process for nearly a year.

“What it means to me is that I’m equal, really equal under the eyes of the law. I’m just as good as everybody else, you know,” he said. “I’m just as likely a parent as anybody else, even though we’re going about parenthood a little differently than some.”

He estimates that he and his husband have spent between $15,000 and $20,000 in legal fees so far with this adoption.

“Fortunately, we’re both, you know, professionally employed, so it’s not necessarily a matter of the money,” he said. “But those are funds that could be put toward helping to raise a child, helping to provide for that child. Honestly, it just seems like I’m paying money to jump through hoops.”

A county attorney spokesman said Taylor-Zaborski’s expenses are not typical, but did not have an official value estimate for the county’s legal help with adoptions. Last year, the county assisted in nearly 300 adoptions. 

Woman scammed for bail money, legal fees: Parma Police Blotter

PARMA, Ohio — Traffic pursuit, Bradley Ave: About 10:15 a.m. July 2, officers attempted to conduct a traffic stop on Bradley Avenue. The female driver did not immediately pull over, causing a police pursuit on Bradley. The woman was eventually stopped and arrested because of prior warrants out for her arrest.

Burglary, Chevrolet Blvd: On July 5, officers received a report that a home on the 5500 block of Chevrolet Boulevard had been burglarized. The owner said that an unknown person entered the home through an unlocked window and that items had been removed from the home. Police do not have any suspects.

Breaking and entering, Snow Rd: About 2:30 a.m. July 6, police responded to a call of a glass breakage alarm at the RadioShack electronics store at 1765 Snow Road. Merchandise was missing from the store. Police have not made any arrests.

Theft, West 24th St: About 1 p.m. July 6, police responded to a theft report at John Muir Elementary School on West 24th Street. A bicycle was stolen from the school. Officers arrested a juvenile for theft.

Theft, Ridge Rd: On July 7, officers received a theft report from a customer at the PetSmart located on Ridge Road. The woman said that an unknown individual took her purse while it was unattended in her shopping cart. Police have not made any arrests.

Theft, Lancelot Dr: On July 9, police received a theft report from a woman who lives on the 7200 block of Lancelot Drive. The woman said that an unknown individual pretending to be the woman’s granddaughter claimed she needed bail money and successfully scammed the woman. The woman was scammed once more from the unknown person when they asked for additional funds to cover legal fees.

Shutting Down People's Lobby Would Be Big Loss

In the early years of the last decade, difficult state budget years, there were constant threats to eliminate a health insurance program for low-income adults without children, as a way to save money. But advocates for those clients succeeded in keeping the program alive. With the coming of Obamacare it became HUSKY D, and it now covers more than 160,000 people.

The advocates in this and many similar cases were lawyer-lobbyists from the Legal Assistance Resource Center of Connecticut, the lobbying and public policy arm of the state’s three legal-aid groups. Over the years, LARC has lobbied and influenced legislation on everything from tenants’ rights and predatory lending to access to the courts, affordable housing and employment. But not for much longer. Faced with a major funding crisis, the legal aid groups are shutting down LARC in September, CT Mirror’s Mark Pazniokas reports.

This would be a devastating loss, and not just to the poor. When LARC advocates for sound banking policies or rights of renters, it helps a lot of middle-class people as well. LARC’s highly regarded Raphael L. “Rafie” Podolsky has often been the only lobbyist representing the public on banking legislation. History sugests that insiders sometimes game the system for the well-connected if no one is there to call them on it. We are all better off if Mr. Podolsky is in the room.

The program should be preserved.

Legal aid services are funded by interest on lawyers’ trust accounts, or IOLTA, the interest on accounts that lawyers hold for clients or third parties for such things as real estate closings. In 2007, the program generated nearly $21 million for legal aid, but it’s fallen by a stunning 90 percent since the recession of 2008 slowed real-estate transactions and drove down interest rates, Mr. Pazniokas reports.

The state created another revenue stream, fees on civil court filings, but these have been flat. The result is that reserve funds are gone and the programs are running at a deficit, Steven D. Eppler-Epstein, executive director of Connecticut Legal Services, told The Mirror. Rather than lay off staff lawyers who provide direct legal services to the poor — some of whom have been laid off — they chose to close LARC.

We need both. A lawyer who keeps a client from being unfairly evicted helps that person. When LARC advocates get a law passed that prevents unfair evictions, they help many people.

Legal aid officials say that using contract lobbyists and other legal aid lawyers can somewhat mitigate the loss of LARC. But while the lobbyists, Betty Gallo and Kate Robinson, are first-rate, they have other clients and often rely on LARC for research and analysis.

The legal aid funding crisis is genuine, and troubling. It’s left the aid groups with nothing but bad choices. Nonetheless we urge them to try again, to make sure every potential funding stone has been turned. For example, are there foundations that work in the subject areas that LARC covers, such as housing, health care, family services, etc., who might support the effort?

Rep. Matt Lesser, D-Middletown, said that LARC is in many ways “the conscience of the legislature.” That would make it essential.

Copyright © 2015, Hartford Courant

Acquitted priest wants archdiocese to pay legal costs

A Twin Cities priest acquitted of sexual misconduct last year wants the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis to reimburse him for more than $46,000 in legal costs.

In December, a jury found the Rev. Mark Huberty not guilty of two counts of sexual misconduct. He had been charged with having a sexual relationship with a woman with whom he also had a pastoral relationship.

In a claim filed in federal bankruptcy court, Huberty, who is still a priest, wrote that he was seeking reimbursement “as a matter of equity.”

“The charges brought against me related to the exercise of my professional role as priest and pastor within the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis,” Huberty said. “Since then, there have been several charges, both civil and criminal, brought against the Archdiocese and individual priests and bishops related to the professional roles, and it is widely known that their legal expenses have been paid for by the Archdiocese.”

Practical Legal Tips For Today's Record Producer

Headphones-piano-music-for-adsAs the role of the record producer continues to evolve, there is some important legal information that should be kept in mind, particularly for those producers who are more involved with the composition of the music they produce.

With record producers now playing a larger and larger role in the creative composition of albums, it is more important than ever that these producers have a solid understanding of their claim to both the sound recording and composition copyrights of the music they produce before rushing to sign any contracts. This article by Wallace Collins on MusicThinkTank.com provides some useful legal advice on how these producers should proceed in order to avoid being manipulated by others in the industry.

“Producers now sometimes not only help capture the sound in the studio and use the available technology to mold the sound to be as commercially acceptable as possible, but more and more producers are finding and discovering new talent and developing the artist’s sound and even, in some cases, collaborating on the artist’s sound as well as co-writing the songs.”

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Jeb Bush: No illegal immigrant path to citizenship; legal status earned

HUDSON, N.H. — Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush said Wednesday that he does not support a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants, raising additional questions about his evolution on the thorny issue, which has created headaches for both parties in Washington and the crowded presidential field.

The pressure is on Mr. Bush in New Hampshire, which political observers say could make or break his chance of winning the Republican nomination. He faces the challenges of distancing himself from a number of other candidates who see the state as a springboard to the nomination, and from the lingering legacy of his brother George W. Bush, who oversaw a 2007 immigration program that included path to citizenship.

During an interview Wednesday with the New Hampshire Union Leader in Manchester, Mr. Bush was asked whether he supported a pathway to full citizenship. He replied, “No.”

“What do we do with the 11 million people here? I think the answer is earned legal status,” he said.

He made the comments a day after former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, the front-runner for the Democratic nomination, accused Mr. Bush of flip-flopping on a pathway to citizenship.

“He doesn’t believe in a path to citizenship. If he did at one time, he no longer does,” Mrs. Clinton said during a rare interview with CNN.

Independent fact-checkers said Mrs. Clinton’s charge was mostly true, although she also has evolved on the issue.

Analysts said it has been hard to pin down Mr. Bush on the issue. They cannot determine whether Mr. Bush is pushing to permanently bar those who receive “earned legal status” from eventually applying for citizenship or whether it would be a step in that direction.

“I think that his pronouncements on immigration should be met with the utmost skepticism,” said Steven Camarota, director of research for the Center for Immigration Studies, which has warned about the bad effects of legal and illegal immigration. “There is a lot of gray area here.”

Frank Sharry, executive director of America’s Voice, which advocates for a pathway to citizenship, agreed from the other end of the issue, saying it has “been tricky to follow” Mr. Bush on the matter.

“It is a divisive issue within the party, and even Jeb Bush is speaking out of both sides of his mouth,” Mr. Sharry said.

Indeed, Mr. Bush has come under fire from grass-roots conservatives and tea partyers for his support of Common Core and his comments on immigration.

“I suspect he is going to vague on it on purpose, because he wants to say to the conservatives in the party that ‘I am against citizenship,’ and he wants Latinos to hear, ‘I am open to citizenship,’” Mr. Sharry said. “Him saying ‘earned legal status’ is deliberately vague to communicate the hard-line position to the right, but it also is not so clear, so that he can still pivot on the issue in the general election.”

The Bush camp downplayed the notion that Mr. Bush has moved on the issue, saying he wants legal status but would be willing to support a pathway to citizenship. Mr. Bush, though, restated his position during a town-hall-style meeting at a local Veterans of Foreign Wars hall in response to a question from a voter.

“I honestly think we need to provide a path to legalized status, not citizenship, for illegal immigrants,” Mr. Bush said.

Story Continues →

Noah Thomas case: legal battle over cellphone continues

PULASKI — Prosecutors were unaware of a cellphone discovered in Noah Thomas’ pocket until receiving an autopsy report more than two months after the 5-year-old was found dead in a septic tank, according to a motion filed Tuesday.

The phone was included in a list of personal effects the medical examiner compiled March 27, the day after the boy was discovered, according to a motion filed last month by the lawyer defending his mother, Ashley White, 31. She is accused of felony homicide in her son’s death.

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